Free Strategy Selection Handbook

When it comes to option trading strategies, there is no ‘one strategy fits all’! It is important to consider the current market conditions as well as personal criteria and more when choosing an option strategy to trade.

Strategy Selection Handbook

  • Implied Volatility
  • Account Size
  • Directional Assumption
  • Risk Preferences
  • Profit Potential
  • Probability of Profit
  • Time

Those are just some of many very important factors that every options trader has to take into consideration when choosing an option strategy. As you can see, this can quickly become very overwhelming.

That’s why I created this new handbook. This strategy selection handbook is designed to take care of all the factors to consider when choosing between a huge variety of option strategies. In it, a multitude of different option strategies are compared and displayed in a very simple manner. This will allow you to easily find the best option trading strategy for your preferences and for your trading setup.

So instead of having to keep track of dozens of trading strategies, you can filter out all the inappropriate strategies within seconds.

I truly believe that this is a very useful guide that visually displays the best use of different trading strategies. Furthermore, this guide won’t set you back a penny as it is 100% free of charge!

All you have to do to gain full instant access to this handbook is submit your primary email in the form below so that I can send you a copy directly into your inbox:

 

An Example:

Here is a brief example taken directly out of the Handbook:

Let’s say, you want to trade options on XYZ. You currently have a neutral (range-bound) directional assumption meaning that you don’t expect it to move significantly in either direction. This is your first criterion which you can use to filter out all non-neutral option strategies.

Furthermore, XYZ has high implied volatility (IV). To profit from a drop in IV, you should find a strategy with a negative Vega. In addition to that, you only have limited buying power available. Therefore, you would prefer a defined risk strategy over an undefined risk strategy. Another criterion that you may want for your strategy is a positive Theta. A positive Theta would mean that the strategy profits from time decay.

Now you already have enough criteria to filter out the vast majority of option strategies. The desired strategy should have:

  • A Delta near 0 (range-bound)
  • A negative Vega (high volatility)
  • A defined Risk
  • A positive Theta

With the help of this guide, you can quickly decrease the size of the huge list of potential option strategies to the following:

  • Short Iron Condors
  • Long Butterflies

To choose one of these strategies, you could then compare them in even more aspects.

Hopefully, this example gives you a good idea of how this guide can be of great use for your options trading. Obviously, you can use more or fewer criteria to filter out unfitting strategies…

The Strategies:

All of the following 28 strategies are compared in 9 different aspects:

  • Short Iron Condors
  • Long Iron Condors
  • Short Strangles
  • Long Strangles
  • Short Straddles
  • Long Straddles
  • Long Butterflies
  • Short butterflies
  • Bull Put Credit Spreads
  • Bear Call Credit Spreads
  • Bull Call Debit Spreads
  • Bear Put Debit Spreads
  • Put Broken Wing Butterflies
  • Call Broken Wing Butterflies
  • Short Puts
  • Short Calls
  • Long Calls
  • Long Puts
  • Covered Calls
  • Covered Puts
  • Call Ratio Back Spreads
  • Put Ratio Back Spreads
  • Call Ratio Front Spreads
  • Put Ration Fron Spreads
  • Long Stock
  • Short Stock
  • Synthetic Long Stock
  • Synthetic Short Stock

 

Hopefully, you can find value in this free 12-page handbook. If not, please let me know how I can improve the handbook!

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